Demand Media Studios: Segmentation Changes (aka Beta Tests)

| February 7, 2011

Demand Media Studios is making a few changes. I’m not quite sure how things will pan out but until the segmentation changes are fully explained, DMS writers are feeling a bit uneasy.Egg Basket

My buddy Ken over at The Freelancer Today is right on top of things.  He’s putting together a list of writing venues that might prove to be a nice alternative to writing for DMS. Ken’s list, appropriately entitled Egg Baskets, includes a few content mill sites and many sites outside of the content mill category.

It’s not a complete list, but there’s more than enough there to get you started if you’re looking for a DMS alternative.

Thanks Ken for helping out your fellow writers.

Tags: ,

Category: Demand Studios, Legitimate, Opportunities

About the Author ()

Felicia A. Williams is a freelance writer and blogger. She spends the majority of her time with her family and writing. If she's not writing or commenting on NJFM, she's either outside smelling the roses or writing articles for one of her other sites.

Comments (7)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Geoff says:

    Not sure if this has been discussed else where on this site, but Demand articles are down to zero in most sections. Yes, zero. There isn’t any work for the majority of writers and according to the latest email from Demand, this will be the norm for the foreseeable future. Writers are totally freaking out in the Demand forums.

    Terrible turn of events with the economy being the way it is and the holidays approaching. My condolences to all that have relied on Demand for income.

    Felicia, do you still write for Demand? I still have permissions but have devoted my time to other projects. Good thing I did.

    • Felicia says:

      Geoff, I haven’t written for Demand Studios in several months. I last wrote there as a knee jerk reaction to the first Panda algorithm change. I’ve since realized that I could do better elsewhere.

  2. Michael says:

    This looks like a good list. No matter what happens with segmentation, people should be looking to diversify. That’s always the name of the game with freelancing.

  3. Angela says:

    Hi all. I’m glad to know that I’m not the only one having problems with DS. Their editors are very picky on stupid stuff, the titles are ridiculous…

    The funny thing is, I got approval the very same day to write for them, but my articles keep getting rejected for crazy stuff so I decided to take a break from them 🙂

    Felicia, thanks for helping us newbies with all your helpful posts. Thank you!

  4. Tom says:

    Thanks for the link and suggestions. I think demand studios is the pits… the idiotic topics, and the more idiotic editors.

    Can’t even remember how many times I have been asked such things:

    Please add the (topic) into the things you need list.
    Please take out (topic) from the things you need list as people already know they need it.
    Please explain why we are even doing (topic).
    The (topic) doesn’t make sense, why would you do it.

    Seriously, do they think the topics are the writers ideas. Would I really submit a 400 word article on how to heat up a grill or break an egg.
    Tom recently posted…Be afraid… be very afraid!!My Profile

  5. Anne Baley says:

    Felicia, I’ve already begun branching out (due in part to Ken’s excellent encouragements and advice) but for those who rely solely on DMS for their income, today may be the kick in the pants they need. Freelancing is not like working for an employer. You can’t count on one client for all of your business any more than a restaurant can count on one customer for theirs. DMS may be better than fudge-frosted cupcakes, but the wise writer will apply to three or four other writing sites, as well as begin working on residual income. It takes time and you may have to give up some tv shows for a while, but it will be worth it in the long run if you don’t fall into a deep hole if the worst happens.

    • Felicia says:

      Good point Anne. Too many people take the job mentality from the workplace into their freelance writing career. They get comfortable “working for” one company and they stay there. They complain a bit, but since it pays the bills they take the good with the bad.

      It’s unfortunate that so many of us were raised to think that way. It takes a lot of reprogramming to rewire our brain to consider alternative methods for earning money.

      It seems that you’ve made the switch and are well on your way to diversification. I just hope others follow suit.