Be wary of e-mail processing scams

| June 23, 2008 | 0 Comments

I was reading a few posts on one of the forms that I occasionally frequent and there was a post from an individual encouraging people to participate in an e-mail processing program. According to the poster he made over $200 a day in one hour. Not only that, he received payment daily to boot.

Of course it sounded too good to be true and being the myth buster that I tend to be I decided to do a little (and I mean very little) research. This obvious scam bait wasn’t worth doing an in-depth dissertation.

A Little Research

A couple of clicks brought me to this page, (just one of many). In essence, this e-mail processing program seems to be the online equivalent of the old ‘stuffing envelopes’ work at home scam. It only took a few clicks to find out the scoop.

[smartads]

Don’t let your intense desire to earn money online prevent you from doing the necessary research before buying into a program. Folks who are at their wits end and desperate to earn money might just fall for such e-mail processing scams. As you have no doubt read several times on line and off line, if it sounds too good to be true…it is. If they ask for credit card information before you can earn money with their brand of job…click away. It is absolutely possible to earn money on line without paying a cent.

A Few Assumptions

I once posted my previous statement about earning money without paying a cent in a forum and one of the forum participants actually posted that it was impossible to do. “After all, you had to buy a computer and pay for internet access.” He then went on a tirade about how nothing was free.

I know my blog readers are a much more on the ball than that particular forum participant. The assumption is …if you’re sitting here reading this post, you have access to a computer and the internet. The very same access you’re using now is exactly all you need to earn money on line. Just let your mouse do the preliminary research work for you before you sign up for a money making program.

If you’re not sure whether or not it’s a scam, remember this, “When it doubt, click out.”

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Category: Internet, Scams

About the Author ()

Felicia A. Williams is a freelance writer and blogger. She spends the majority of her time with her family and writing. If she’s not writing or commenting on NJFM, she’s either outside smelling the roses or writing articles for one of her other sites.

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